If the `and` conjunction is replaced by/together with/accompanied by/and, the verb has no effect on the later part of these expressions. The words before these expressions are the themes. A singular verb is a verb to which one s is added in the present, such as writings, plays, races and modes of use as is, what, has, does. A plural verb has not added s, such as writing, games, execution, and forms used as are, have and do. Rule 5 bis. Sometimes the subject is separated from the verb by such words, as with, as well as, except, no, etc. These words and phrases are not part of the subject. Ignore them and use a singular verb if the subject is singular. Some names are always unique and indeterminate.

When these names become subjects, they always take individual verbs. A prepositional sentence can be placed between the subject and the verb. Note: The word dollar is a special case. When we talk about a money supply, we need a singular verb, but if we refer to the dollars themselves, a plural verb is necessary. There are a few occasions when we should use singular verbs. Expressions like everyone, everyone, everyone, person and person must be followed by a singular verb. Although each part of the composite subject is singular (Ranger and Camper), together (linked by and), each part of a plural structure and must therefore take a plural verb (see) to accept in the sentence. Expressions of rupture like half, part of, a percentage of, the majority of are sometimes singular and sometimes plural, depending on the meaning.

(The same is true, of course, when all, all, more, most and some act as subjects.) The totals and products of mathematical processes are expressed in singular and require singular verbs. The phrase «more than one» (weirdly) takes on a singular verb: «More than one student has tried to do so.» Example: The list of items is on the desktop. If you know that the list is the topic, then choose for the verb. RULE5: Subjects related to «and» are plural. Subjects related to «or» or «Nor» take a verb that corresponds to the last subject. For example, Bob and George are leaving. Neither Bob nor George go. 2. If two or more individual names or pronouns are bound by or even, use a singular verb. These rules of agreement do not apply to verbs used in the simple past without helping verbs.